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  • SLIDER FOR HOMEPAGE | Budokan World

    SLIDER TEST FOR HOMEPAGE

  • MEMORIAM | Budokan World

    MEMORIAM Here we will hold a listing of Dan Grades, Teachers, Dojo Leaders and Students who have passed away that we are aware of. ​ If we hold any biographical data in text, pictures, audio or video then the relevant persons name will be underlined and by clicking on that name, you will be taken to a special page dedicated to that person and his or her biographical history. Please send us a picture and any relevant information we can verify against anyone listed on this page and we will post it up - forever. ​ We also have many individuals to remember for their unstinting contribution to Japanese Budo that they made, often with great personal sacrifice during their lives. This page will honour them too, for whom all of us connected with Budokan, shall be forever grateful. We shall always remember them. RAY RYAN WHITEY POLLETT WILLIE RIDDEX DUNLOP PAUL VIC SYKES JON WYATT LEO LIPINSKI FRANK VAN RENSBURG BOB SIMMS DOUGGIE KNOX SANDI GROOM CLIFF LAWRIE-ROSS MIKE BOND CAROL LEVY HERBIE EDWARDS HENNIE VAN DER MERWE NEIL CRAFFORD AMADEO NUNES HAROLD LIND JEAN RESCH JULIE TULLIS ANDREW BROWN BOB ALLAN TREVOR HUGHES IAN CARD BRIAN VAN DER MERWE JOHAN COETZEE ANDRE THERON ​ "We all get told stories by our parents as we grow up. The strongest memories I have of stories told by Sandi, my Mum are of Budokan. A child of the 50's with a rebellious streak I know she was difficult for her parents to handle as a young woman, running away more than once - and running with a colourful crowd. When Budokan came into her life, the discipline and the people meant more to her than anything she had felt before. Sadly we lost our Mum too young. I wish she had kept with the practice and the people - but it was not to be. A spiritual person, she connected with the practice, the teacher (Dave Passmore) and fellow student (Dave Wills), from my memory this was perhaps the happiest period of her life. A great mum to my three sisters and me, a character with strong opinions, we miss her greatly. If she were alive now she would be so proud to be on this list amongst the other yudansha whom she loved so much. " My own recollections follow; Sandi was bold, headstrong, true to her convictions, and very forthright. Starting her karate career in her late teens at the original 1972 Northolt dojo, with Sensei Passmore, then Nidan, she rapidly showed a talent for martial arts. She can truly be considered a founder of the Northolt dojo. She had excellent technique and became the inspiration for many more ladies and girls to join the dojo, and the subsequent Harrow dojo, in those early days. She also worked with Sensei to develop "feminine" versions of the basic kata, though this experiment eventually stopped. Typically, Sandi herself preferred the traditional forms! She was graded to Shodan. Sandi moved to Cornwall when her first child, Lee, was born and eventually settled in Devon. She became an accomplished gardener. She was a diehard supporter of animal rights and humane animal husbandry. She was a staunch and loyal supporter to those she identified as friends, and of course, her family. She brought up her four children mostly on her own, all of whom, unsurprisingly, given her own character, became strong, independent, and successful individuals in their own spheres. She died unfortunately young, leaving her son, three beautiful daughters, and three boisterous grandsons. VIC SYKES It is with great sorrow that we bring you news of the passing of Vic Sykes on the morning of Sunday 14 August 2016- after complications had arisen following a triple heart bypass operation in Durban South Africa. A well known and much revered member of Budokan SA, Vic became a highly skilled Karate practitioner and a great teacher. He is left by his lovely wife Moira and their son Clinton. Vic Sykes - far right - attending one of the many Budokan events in sunny Durban. His wife Moira is facing away from the camera in the foreground. On the far right - sitting down is Pam - the wife of the late Ray Ryan - one of the Co-Founders of Budokan SA. In the centre of the pic at the back is Derrick Wridgway, whom Budokan UK students may recall visiting us at one of our workshops with his lovely wife Sylvia 5 years ago. Other people Sensei Passmore recognises are Mike Bond seated in the middle and Alan Haig - standing in between Derrick and Vic at the back. KANETSUKA SENSEI passed away on 8 March 2019 OKIMITSU FUJII passed away on 10 April 2017 It is with great sadness that we hear of the passing of Fujii Sensei - a much loved and highly respected teacher of Japanese Budo - with just a slight penchant for Kendo. Many Budokan students would have fondly rembered Fujii Sensei at the Traditional Japanese Budo events that were held in the magnificent Dome at the University of Derby Buxton, where this picture of him was taken in 2014. VICTOR HARRIS We are saddened to hear of the passing of Victor Harris who is famous for translating Go Rin No Sho by Miyamoto Musashi - A Book of Five Rings - a master class of strategy that should be in all Japanese Budo students bookshelves. The philosophy behind it is influenced by Zen, Shinto and Confucianism, and came to be used by many corporations around the world, especially in Japan. The cover below shows an 1848 print of a picture by Kuniyoshi, showing Miyamoto Musashi practising fencing with two sticks, which became the hallmark of his technique and sword style. RIP LEN BLUNT It is with great sadness, that we have to post the news that Len Blunt, a former student of Budokan and beloved Father of one of our Dan Grades, Alex Blunt, passed away in Oakhaven Hospice in Lymington, after a pretty long battle with prostrate cancer. Len was a gentle soul and was much loved by all who knew him and had the pleasure of spending some time with him. RIP

  • MEMBERSHIP INFO | Budokan World

    MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION HOW BUDOKAN WORK S Budokan exists as a constituted organisation since 1970 to promote the development of traditional Japanese Budo in the UK and Europe. See Lineage ​ Budokan is responsible for the implementation of a teaching syllabus in the various Dojo or locations, where this syllabus is taught. Budokan confers the right of recognised and appointed instructors within each of these recognised Dojo to teach this syllabus as set down by David Passmore the Founder of Budokan UK. The disciplines taught are Aikido, Iaido, Karatedo and Zen - which means editation. Prospective students come to us for a variety of reasons, and every one of them is encouraged to come to any of our dojo to meet us and see what we do. It is here at this introductory meeting, that a class can be observed and questions can be answered. We explain how we work, our fee structure, how gradings are conducted and introduce you to some of the students present, so that p rospective students can get a “feel” for how things are done. Budokan reserves the right to reject any membership application made to it and further to reserve the right to discipline any member for unacceptable behaviour, in any way it deems appropriate. We have been in existence in the UK for 52 years and have never refused an application. Anyone interested in joining Budokan is encouraged to come for a few classes of practice and training, before a decision is made to become a member. Clothing in the form of a Gi is available for these classes to those who wish to take advantage of this offer, prior to buying their own. See Equipment Classes Each class is taught in such a way, so as to appeal to both the beginner and advanced student alike. Duration Each class lasts around one and a half hours. Eating Please ensure that meals are not taken at least 2 hours before undertaking any training. Membership The full annual membership fee is £50.00 and is payable during the month of January every year. The annual membership fee or part thereof (if joining later in the year) is payable 1 month after commencing classes. Membership Entitlements Classes in Traditional Japanese Budo Events, Seminars and Workshops take place at various times and locations each year. Budokan teaching and philosophy Kyu and Dan Grading Accreditation Entitles members to be graded according to the training schedule laid down by Budokan and to receive certification accordingly. See Certification Registration and recognition of Dan Grades and Titles by Dai Nippon Butokukai (DNBK) - in Kyoto, Japan (There is a separate charge for this) Monthly Learning Fees Training takes place in the Dojo. Learning takes place online in our Library. These fees are not based on attendance at the Dojo only - as just as much learning is taking place online now, which can be accessed at any time and this trend will continue into the future. The learning fee is therefore based on content provided for training in the Dojo, complemented by content available online, including text, audio, pictures and video, only to those who pay this fee, who will have automatic access to the Library by unique password only. These fees are due on the first day of each month, and are variable from year to year. All fees are paid initially by bank transfer and then by Monthly Standing Order or Direct Debit We pride ourselves in trying to provide the very best tuition for all of our members at all times. ​ ​ GRADINGS AND RECOGNITION ​ Budokan confers its grades and ranks onto its exponents of Japanese Budo disciplines that it teaches, in much the same way as the Classical Bujutsu Menkyo system operated and still found in some Ryu in Japan today. Gradings radings do not take place as a form of a test on a given day. Budokan “gradings” take place each and every time a student comes to train in the dojo by peer review, where things like attitude, respect, loyalty, courtesy, diligence, compassion and attendance are all closely observed. Grades are awarded annually duriing the last Workshop of each year and when required at courses such as Workshops that take place throughout each year. Kyu Grades - Mudansha - All ranks below Black Belt are awarded verbally and result in the student being recognised for the progress made up to Dan Grade rank. All students start out wearing a white belt, then move up to green belt and on to brown belt in recognition of the progress being made. At the appropriate time the student will be invited to prepare for their Shodan or First Black Belt one year in advance of taking this grading. Students who have had previous experience in Budo may be asked to prepare for their Shodan or First Black Belt, if approved of by the Shihankai or Senior Dan Grade members or officers of the Dojo. In the first instance, the training schedule is applied to four elements. Zanshin – literally translated as “the observation of the opponent or situation before, during and after the execution of the technique”. Waza – the technical ability in the performance of technique. It is part of Zanshin and includes posture, stance, strength, stamina and flexibility. Aite no keiko – Partner Practice. The ability to function with a partner incorporating Zanshin and Waza. Koko no keiko – Individual Practice. The ability to express Zanshin and Waza on one’s own. In the second instance the grading considers the individual’s:- attendance record contribution to the dojo personal character Dan Grades - Yudansaha All eligible Kyu grade students are allowed to take their Black Belt Dan Grades by invitation only under the same peer review process. Budokan will only award its coveted Black Belt in Budo to those who have accomplished an advanced level in Karate, Aikido and Iaido. Budokan only provides certification for Dan Grades and these certificates are awarded once a year at the annual end of year Workshop, which takes place in early December. Black Belt or Shodan certified students will be invited to wear the hakama as part of their dojo apparel, which makes them instantly recognisable as a Dan Grade. All Dan Grades are eligible to be registered with the Dai Nippon Butokukai (DNBK) in Kyoto, Japan by discipline - as recommended by Budokan. There is a charge from the DNBK for this accreditation. Further guidelines for Dan Grade holders Dan means step. So holding a 1st Dan is simply the first step along the journey. It is the base camp and not the smmit of the mountain of a lifetime dedication to training, so often depicted as just that in the West. In Japan, it is simply a step from nothing to something on the lowest rung of the Dan Grade ladder. In Japan you will need to have the rank of Godan - 5 Dan - before you are recogised as having devoted many years to training. Recmmendation is based on years of training, skill prowess, accmplishments, dedication and service, teaching and instruction and excellence in personal character. ​ SEE ACCREDITATION AND CERTIFICATION . ​ ​ It is important that all students have the correct clothing and equipment in order to practice traditional Japanese Budo safely. Budokan adopts a "No Gi - No Training" rule. You will need a white Gi to practise - see below. You will not be allowed to practice without one. For the forst month of training Budokan can provide new members with a Gi to wear at no charge. Just let us know and we will arrange one for all new members without a Gi. After the first month, new members will be required to buy their own Gi. This equipment can be ordered through Budokan via Nine Circles - a UK based importer, who we recommend for all equipment for beginners and new students. We have a discount arrangement in place with them for our members. Please ask for further information. Click any of the three llinks below, to view the exact recommended items for all new members and beginners. CLOTHING AND EQUIPMENT Aikido Gi - Intermediate 500g Sashiko Ori All these gi have been preshrunk - but on a hot wash and dryer - there is a little further shrinkage. Height Chart Feet/InchesCm Feet/InchesCm 5’ 2”1603 5’ 9”1805 5’ 4”1653.5 6’ 0”1855.5 5’ 55”1704 6’ 2”1906 5’ 7”1754.5 6’ 5”1956.5 Within the first three months all new members will need to buy a wooden sword (bokken) and staff (jo) for training purposes. Shiro Kashi White Oak Bokken 102cm Product Code Daito Includes Tsuba and Dome Shiro Kashi White Oak Jo Total length 127cm 2.5cm in diameter Product code – Jo ​ ​ Budokan is a member of the Nine Circles Giri discount scheme on mpst of their clothing and equipment. If yoiu are a member of Budokan and wish to benefit from discounts on offer - just email us and we will send y iou our username and passward. You can then buy direct. AFTER THE FIRST THREE YEARS MOST STUDENTS WILL WANT TO UPGRADE THEIR EQUIPMENT AND BUDOKAN WILL THEN RECOMMEND BUYING DIRECT FROM JAPAN FROM RELIABLE SOURCES KNOWN TO US. ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

  • Classical Japanese Budo | Budokanworld.com

    BUDOKAN 1960 - 2024 STRONG IN HAND. KIND IN HEART. The classical budo, or "martial ways" are not combat systems like their forerunner, bujutsu, or "martial arts"; nor are they sports like modern judo, kendo, or karate. They are first and foremost spiritual disciplines, whose ultimate goal, achieved through the most rigorous mental and physical training, is self-realization in the tradition of Zen Buddhism . Donn F. Draeger Classical Budo A LINEAGE ALL BUT FORGOTTEN The Yushinkan SHINSEI DOJO There are few martial artists in history who have been able to influence an entire generation of politicians, military personnel, police, educators, and civilians alike. Who’s student’s (if only for a day) talked about their experiences with him in detail nearly seventy years after his death. The first San-Dou-no-Hanshi in history. The “God of Kendo” ( Nakayama Hakudo. 12 BEST GENERAL BENEFITS OF MEDITATION Meditation has been shown to offer many benefits. Although it’s well known as a technique to reduce stress and anxiety, research shows that it may also help enhance your mood, promote healthy sleep patterns, and boost cognitive skills. Meditation is the habitual process of training your mind to focus and redirect your thoughts. The popularity of meditation is increasing as more people discover its many health benefits. You can use it to increase awareness of yourself and your surroundings. Many people think of it as a way to reduce stress and develop concentration. People also use the practice to develop other beneficial habits and feelings, such as a positive mood and outlook, self-discipline, healthy sleep patterns, and even increased pain tolerance. This article reviews 12 health benefits of meditation - ....read more... ​ ​ SHIHANKAI MEETING NOTICE A meeting was called to deal with matters arising from the voting in of two new members - Shihan Rob Rohrey Godan and Shihan Roy Estabrook Godan. - onto the Accreditation and Certification Pane at a meeting of the Shihanail on 3 September 2023. ​ There were basically two issues:The Accreditation and Certification Process and as a result, a working Title change for Sensei David Passmore. It was also decided to bring in an additional high grade representative from the Technical Panel in order to balance the technical expertise on the Accreditation Panel. ​ Kyoshi Darren Waghorne Rokedan fits this description perfectly. So that will bring the number of Members of this Panel to 5. ​ All these members will be entitled to have their Henko - representing their Signature - appear in full on all future Certification. ​ David Passmore's title of Kyoshi awarded by the DNBK in Kyoto shall remain a title awarded by them. It shall be supported by a new title for general use from now on. ​ His new Title will be Saisho Sensei 最初の先生 which simply means First Teacher as he was indeed the very first Budokan teacher in the UK from 1970. The name he wants used is Saisho - a shortened version of the above and is more informal than Saisho Sensei. ​ A more formal notification will be posted on this site and mailed t to all members shortly. SUCH SAD NEWS ON HANSHI HANS HAUPT It is with great sadness that we hear of the passing of Hanshi Hans Haupt recently. ​ He was a huge influence on Tenshinkan Karate in Japan and around the world and particularly Joe Bracone, with whom he is pictured here recently. ​ Kindly go Seichin Dojo page for moro info. MIKE CLAPHAM PERFORMING TEKKI SHODAN JAPANESE BUDO RESEARCH We publish news stories, schoLarly articles and academic papers from Aikido to Zen in all things Traditional Japanese Budo, that we hope will be of interest to both teacher and student alike. All articles and papers will first appear here on the Homepage. After that they will be posted on the Budo Research page under the name of the discipline or context. When a single discipline reaches 12 or more articles or papers it will be given its own page. All papers are the responsibility of each individual author and do not necessarily reflect the views of budokanworld.com. Just click on any of the links below to read more. ZEN IS NOT BUDDHISM SHORT EVOLUTION OF JAPANESE MARTIAL ARTS ON THE PRINCIPLES OF AIKIDO INTERESTING FACTS ON HISTORY OF MARTIAL ARTS TRADITIONAL MARTIAL ARTS V MARTIAL SPORTS ANALYSIS OF KICKING TECHNIQUES IN KARATE PHILOSOPHY AND TOKUGAWA BUSHIDO This s interesting. Click the icon below and read the PDF SAISHO SENSEI'S TIPS ON SOME BASICS Basic Karate Blocking techniques and Deflections. Basic Karate Striking techniques A quick run through of some Aikido Basics Basic Aikido wristwork and handling the Bokken DOWN MEMORY LANE University of Derby Buxton 2011. The scene of the First Open Traditional Japanese Budo 2 day Seminars in the UK for decades with Budokan heavily involved in the creation, organisation and management of the event with great back up from the University and from a legion of like minded people passionate about Budo,like the very well known David Ansell who helped initiate the event and played an important part in its success. A JAPANESE GLOSSARY FOR KARATE STUDENTS First they published A Short History of Karate. Now Michael Cowie and Robert Dyson are soon to publish another little gem this year. Budokan has been given a glimpse of their work and you can too by clicking on the image below. And its not that little either! Enjoy. CONGRATULATIONS PETER BUSH Began training with Budokan in 1971. His name is on the Budokan Black Belt Register, which records the names and the year of being awarded their first degree Black Belt in 1977 - their Shodan - and of of which he is now the Registrar. Peter is a devoted and loyal member of the Budokan Shihankai and is the Deputy Chair. In recognition of his long history and service to Budokan, Peter has been awarded the Title of Kyoshi. Please read his Bio at PETER BUSH . ROY ESTABROOK Began his training with Budokan in 1972. His name also appears on the BB Register in 1977 the year he attained his first degree Black Belt. Roy is a dedicated and loyal member of Budokan Shihankai and sits on the Accreditation Panel. He is well known in many other parts of the world where he has trained with a variety of different Ryu. In recognition of his training and teaching record Roy has been awarded the Rank of Godan . Please read his Bio at DEAL DOJO.

  • SHIKANTAZA | Budokan World

    SHIKANTAZA An aide memoire Shikantaza (just simply sitting) is objectless meditation, in which the practitioner uses the power developed in concentration to remain in a state of conscious awareness. There are a variety of different views on what sikantaza actially means. Some say shikantaza is described best as, "quiet sitting in open awareness, reflecting directly on the reality of life". Shikantaza is often termed a goalless meditation in quiet awareness, not working on any koan, or counting the breath. It is an alert condition, performed erect, with no trace of sluggishness or drowsiness. Som scholars have said that shi means tranquility, kan refers to awareness, ta means hitting exactly the right spot and za means to sit. For me it all comes down to "j ust simply sitting still in tranquil awareness ". Zen - meaning meditation - changes your spirit by reflection. What follows is a short travelogue of nudges, reminders and observations to help you on the road to the Shikantaza experience. On the left hand side you will see some figures in bold . These figures should be used as a rough guide to the aproximate times that should have lapsed during your preparation and each section of your parctice. The first figure is for less experienced maditators. The second figure is for experienced meditators. Everybody is different and you will find out what suits you from your own experience. After you have sat down and become aware that you are upright and comfortable - from that moment prepare yourself - it varies with each individual. Close your eyes lightly - and keep them closed for the entire "zesshin". Breathe from the lower abdomen - so it becomes "abdominal respiration". It also called diaphragmatic respiration. Do not use your upper chest for breathing and keep your shoulders level and relaxed. Place your tongue lightly on the roof of your mouth and try to keep it there. You can't easily breathe in via the mouth if the tongue is in this position for long. You must breathe in and out through the nose. Slowly breathe in through your nose to say 5 seconds. Slowly breathe out through your nose for say 7 seconds Where the CO2 exhaled from your lungs is greater than the oxygen you breathed in. Keep just this going for a while and establish a rhythm of diaphragmatic breathing which reaches an equilibrium of around 5 or 6 seconds and 5 or 6 seconds out. Interestingly, this has historical precedent in religious practices where 6 seconds is exactly the time it takes to accomplish certain Buddhist mantra's and it is also found the same exhalation is used whilst citing the Christian Rosary. ..................................................Now become AWARE. On a wide range of levels. Your stillness is critical so - DO NOT MOVE UNLESS YOU HAVE TO. From below the belt you are absolutely rooted to the spot you are sitting on. No movement there. Your heartbeat - feel it - really feel it. Your body is still and your muscles have nothing to do - so they soften. And soften they do as you take in more oxygen into your blood through the established rhythm of your breathing. As the muscles soften your joints begin to open. There is the rhythm of your lower abdominal nuscles. In the stomach area the Japanese call the Hara. And there you will find what is called the Tanden. The single spot in the lower abdomen - about an inch or so directly below your navel. It is your centre of gravity. As you breathe in - they expand out - not too much. As you breathe out - they contract - just a little more. Maintain the rhythm. Slowly and imperceptibly, your muscles have softened to the point where you have become aware of it and you have to micro manage your posture from time to time in 4 tiny movements. 1 Most peoples heads move a little forward, so every now and then you need to move your head back to the midline of your shoulders and tuck your chin in just a little at the same time. 2 Raise your ribcage - this is the area where most people begin to stoop from. 3 This will lead you to gently make your lumbar vertebrae a little more concave. 4 Allow both shoulders to drop evenly. You will need to continue to make micro adjustments to your posture, (as above) as it naturally changes and you become used to feeling it necessary to do so. Its not a thought process - its just a feeling. And it usually ends up being a lot more comfortable. So keep doing it please. Maintain your breathing ryhthm. And become aware of your senses. Move your attention to your eyes and slowly roll them a little. From there flare your nose a few times as you breathe in. Push your tongue gently up to the roof of your mouth. Become aware of your hearing. Move your fingers a little for touch. And now you sense of being.....here.....now.... Turn your awareness onto your brain. That houses the mind. The best difference between the two I have read is "The brain is indeed the physical structure. Neurons, axons, dendrites, neurotransmitters, synapses, discrete structures… All that and more. The “mind” (consciousness) is the “emergent property” of the activity of that brain". Quora Past , present and future thoughts - pop in and out all the time - as has already been happening to you. Let them come and go. Learn how to get back to your awarenes of what you are doing in the present. Let the past go and do not look to the future - always stay in the present - it is not easy but comes with practice. And the flow of thoughts will begin to slow down as they should have by now. By raising or slowing our brainwaves, we can altar how we think, feel and act. Meditation is the process of slowing our alerting beta brainwaves to the slower states of alpha and theta. Beta is the waking, thinking state. It is our normal state of mind in which we are the highly alert. Alpha is a slower state more indicative of relaxing and reflecting. Meditation is often practiced in the alpha state. Theta is an even slower state perfect for daydreaming and intuitive thinking. Deep meditation and prayer are practiced in the theta state. Delta is the slowest of the four states where sleep occurs. At the slowest delta level, sleep is deep and dreamless. Neuroimaging studies suggest that the normal resting state of the brain is a silent current of thoughts, images and memories that is not induced by sensory input or intentional reasoning, but emerges spontaneously "from within." This is what the Zen Buddhists from the Soto sect refer to as “silent illumination”. And that is what actually happens - as feelings come before thoughts. But here in this stillness of the body, the rhythm of the breath opens the way to a deep, visceral awareness. It is much like Metsuke - a much heightened form of conscious awareness than Zanshin when training in Budo, along with the physical manifestation of Kime when doing any Kata. The head, heart and soul of it all. Our thoughts, our desires and our experiences. It is the awareness of awarenesses. And it is here that you have to work hard at sliencing your inner monologue from trying to analyse or comment on what you see and experience. It is the point when your subjective experiences becomes objective observation. It is where subjective and objective meet. Which ever so slowly over time begins to evolve into a clearer perception of the world inside your head and the real world out there. Images appear and disappear in a kaleidoscope of colour. Some are quite quick and slow to disappear. Some just slowly emerge into recognisable images. Many are landscapes and vistas that are new to you. Some are people and faces you have never seen before. You can't hold on to them for longer than a few seconds - most try to and fail. Swirling cloud-like images float around and past you. Giving you an impression of movement. Slowly you reach a deep state of absolute stilness and silence. It is often referred to as the "void". It is as if you are at the edge of space. You are in awe for what you think is an eternity. .../.../.../.../.../.../.../.../.../.../.../../../../../../../../../../../../../../../.................. Einstein said "The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious; It is the source of all true art and science". How you emerge from this experience depends on the environment you are in. Always try to do so slowly if you can. Keeping your eyes closed for a few minutes more. Tuck your chin in to your chest - round your shoulders and your spine and gently stretch forward, as far as you comfortably can and hold for a minute. Sit up slowly and rotate your shoulders both ways by moving your arms. Move your head up and down slowly. And then to the left and the right. Sit still and upright for a moment with youe eyes open. Feel the moment. Lao Tzu said "Meditation is vital energy". And I do generally feel vitalised and full of energy in the immediate hours thereafter. But for me the chief consequence of doing 45 minutes or an hour of Shikantaza first thing in the morning, is the beautiful feeling of having tapped into my inuitive self aong with a sense of clarity that remains present with me for the rest of my day. Well, almost. It is not easy to practice Shikantaza every day - but the benefits are supreme. Each and every day thereafter. David Passmore Kyoshi At the beginning of 2021 DRAW A VEIL OVER THE FUTURE. LET GO OF THE PAST. EMBRACE THE PRESENT. 5-10

  • SHIHANKAI | Budokan World

    THE BUDOKAN SHIHANKAI All activities that take place within Budokan are managed and operated by its Shihankai. ​ A small group of experienced people, some of whom really do back a very long way indeed. They are all tasked with various responsibilities, ensuring that the technical, educational and organisational standards set by Budokan in all of its operations and entitlements, continue to be at the forefront of its thinking and planning now and for the future of Budokan. ​ The new Budokan Kamiza for all members of the Shihankai and other Teachers and instructors to use in their Dojo. David Passmore ​ FOUNDER HEAD OF DISCIPLINES AND TECHNICAL PANE L MEMBER OF ACCREDITATION PANEL EDITOR, PUBLISHER AND SITE BUILDER OF THIS SITE david@budokanworld.com ​ READ HI BIO Peter Bush DEPUTY HEAD SHIHANKAI MEMBER OF ACCREDITATION PANEL ​ bush.peter@sky.com ​ READ HIS BIO ​ ​ Rob Rohrey MEMBER OF ACCREDITA TION PANEL www.budokan-netherlands.nl rob@budokan-netherlands.nl ​ READ HIS BIO ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Roy Estabrook MEMBER OF ACCREDITATION PANEL ​ royestabrookcam@aol.com ​ READ HIS BIO ​ ​ ​ Katy Passmore ASSISTANT PUBLISHER AND GRAPHIC DESIGN ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Darren Waghorne MEMBER OF DISCIPLINES AND TECHNICAL PANEL darrenwaghorne@yahoo.co.uk ​ ​ READ HIS BIO ​ ​ ​ M ike Clapham MEMBER OF DISCIPLINES AND TECHNICAL PANEL ​ michael_clapham@hotmail.co.uk ​ READ HIS BIO ​ ​ Keith Molyneux ​ spungwort@hotmail.co.uk ​ READ HIS BIO ​​ ​ Joe Bracone ​ joebracone@yahoo.com ​ READ HIS BIO ​

  • CERTIFICATION | Budokan World

    CERTIFICATION With over 60 years of experience and technical excellence to draw on we provide only Black Belt Rank and Title recognition and accreditation to teachers, instructors, dojo leaders and students across all disciplines as a single discipline or as a multi-discipline, on recommendation only. THERE IS A CERTIFICATE OF GRADE OR RANK AND A CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. ​ Each certificate has different wording in English and Japanese. ​ The Certificate of Grade or Rank application is normally completed by the Dojo Leader for a current member of their Dojo. ​ In the event of a Dojo Leader application it must come from an accredited source known to and supported by 2 current Dojo Leaders or Associates. ​ THERE IS A FEE FOR A CERTIFICATE OF RANK. Scroll down for Grading Fee structure. A NOTE ON GRADING FEES For many years Budokan adopted a policy of not charging students for Kyu and Dan grade certification. This decision was justified on the common knowledge of grading systems becoming open to malpractice by officials of larger martial arts groups for the purpose of raising funds. When budokanworld.com was launched in 2010 we decided to ask the Dojo Leaders in the UK/EU/US and other countries, what a fair fee would be to pay for Dan Grades only issued by Budokan. After a few months of deliberation the Dojo Leaders generally felt that Budokan had real value in the technical excellence of their Dan Grades and suggested a number of options from which Budokan settled on the fair and reasonable Fee Structure below which, needless to say is below that which was presented. This is an image of the Budokan Certificate of Rank. and is for visual purposes only. English wording for each of the certificates will appear in the space on the left and the Japanese katakana in the space on the right. This beautiful work of art has been designed by Katy Passmore. They are all printed on Magnolia Parchment. Paper size A3. Explanation of the Henko The larger square Henko is the Seal of Budokan The smaller round Henko are the personal signatures from left to right of Darren Waghorne Rob Rohrey David Passmore Peter Bush Roy Estabrook Kyoshi Godan Saisho Sensei Kyoshi Godan CERTIFICATE OF RANK ​ Recommendation is based on grading record, years of continuous training, technical skill prowess, accomplishments, dedication and service, attitude, teaching and instruction, heart, values and excellence in personal character. General Ranking guide to the timeline of consecutive years of training. Shodan 1st Dan 1-3 years Nidan 2nd Dan 3-5 years Sandan 3rd Dan 5-8 years Yondan 4th Dan 8-12 years Godan 5th Dan 12-18 years Rokudan 6th Dan 18 – 25 years Shichidan 7th Dan 25 – 32 years Hachidan 8th Dan 32- 45 years HOW IT WORKS ​ 1 Each Dojo leader nominates a person or persons for accreditation and certification by Peer Review* directly to Budokan. These requests may be retrospective. 2 Kindly go to ACCREDITATION for the detail of what is required. 3 Upon receipt of this information by email and any attached documentation, we examine the credentials and all endorsements in text, pictorial audio or video format in support of the application. 4 We defer to two of our Community Dojo Leaders to assist us in the examination of those disciplines outside of our remit - such as Ju Jitsu, Kodokan Judo, Kendo and Kobudo. The personal Henko of each of these examiners will appear on the Certificate of Rank along with the Henko of the Doshu Richard Salmon and Kyoshi David Passmore. 5 A period of 6-8 weeks needs to be factored into the review process. 6 Once a decision has been reached either way, the recommender is informed directly by email. 7 If approved, an appropriate certificate is drawn up, dated, numbered and photographed with the appropriate Henko in place. This photographic evidence of Rank will be placed on the appropriate Dojo Page (in the public domain) for all to see. It wi also be registered for copyright protection and placed in our Dan Grade (Black Belt) Register. 8 If not approved, the recommender is informed as to the reasons why this decision has been reached by email and if appropriate offer outline measures to take that will allow a repeat application to take place within 12 months at no further cost to the applicant. 9 All certificates will be carefully rolled up and inserted into a secure tube and sent by post to the recommender to pass on or direct to the receiver, as appropriate. A signature will be required at each destination if possible. * Peer Review functions as a form of self-regulation by qualified members of our Traditional Japanese Budo Community. Recommendations for a person to be awarded a Certificate of Rank, who is no longer active in Budo may also be considered in appropriate circumstances . CERTIFICATE OF RANK FEE STRUCTURE All fees are shown in £GBP 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Shodan Nidan Sandan Yondan Godan Rokudan Chichidan Hachidan 75.00 100.00 130.00 175.00 220.00 260.00 300.00 340.00 CERTIFICATE OF TITLE ​ The Certificate of Title is conferred as an huge honour to bestow upon an individual Budoka deserving of this honour - see below for further definition. We undertake to seek the majority approval from all current Dojo Leaders for each recommendation. If no such majority is reached then Budokan will withdraw its application for a minimum of 12 months. ​ THERE IS NO FEE REQUIRED FOR A CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. (Only a small production cost for the Certificate of Title and Posting and Packaging) ​ ​ The award of Titles is made using the ancient Shogoo system, as used by the Dai Nippon Butokukai of Kyoto in Japan, to those who have made an outstanding contribution to the development of Traditional Japanese Budo, shown leadership in teaching and the maintenance of a high level of Budo skills over decades of continuous service. Shogoo is bestowed upon a highly qualified individual of integrity ad honour with a proven record of achievement in all phases of their Budo. Renshi - Polished Samurai Warrior Kyoshi - Master Teacher Samurai Warrior Hanshi - Exemplary Illustrious Warrior - Master of the Samurai Way In Reference to the three titles Renshi, Kyoshi and Hanshi Ren = A Trainer of the Way Kyo = A Teacher of the Way Han = A Model of the Way Dojo Officials Sempai - a leading instructor Shidoin - a leading head instructor Shihan - a master instructor (For more details please email us at idavid@budokanworld.com ) ​ ​ FURTHER NOTES OF INTEREST ON JAPANESE BUDO TITLES 1. Sensei "Teacher or One who has gone before": This title is by far the most often used title in karate and generally refers to someone of Yon-Dan level (4th Degree Black Belt.) Many senior instructors including Hanshi Masami Tsuruoka, wi ll state that this is the most honorable title that a student can use when referring to the senior as their teacher. The title Sensei implies a close bond between the student and teacher's relationship. 2. Shihan: "Master or Expert Teacher": It is important to understand that the meaning Master as used in the martial arts is someone who has mastered the basic and advanced understandings {Principles} of a particular style or system, thus the title Shihan means someone who has mastered the basic and advanced techniques as well as the principles, concepts, and theory of their respective style of karate. The title Shihan does not mean that this person has stopped learning because they know all of the answers. On the contrary, they are considered to be the most serious and dedicated students in any style of martial arts. The title Shihan is generally considered to be an organizational title alone and has little meaning (May not be recognized) outside of the holders style or organization. 3. Doshi: "Leading Teacher": Title sometimes used before Renshi (3rd dan) 4. Renshi: "Senior Expert Teacher": This is the first of the three generally used teacher titles. Although this title is independent of rank, it is seldom given to anyone below the rank of Go-Dan. (5th dan) 5. Tasshi or Tesshi: "Apprentice Master Teacher": This title was originally the title used instead of Kyoshi. 6. Kyoshi: "Master Teacher, Teacher of Teachers": This is the second of the three generally used teacher titles. Although this title is independent of the ranking system, it is seldom given to anyone below the rank of Roku-dan and in most cases Shichi-dan). (7th dan) 7. Hanshi: "Senior Master Teacher": This is the third and highest of the three generally used teacher titles. Although this title is independent of the ranking system, it is seldom given to anyone below the rank of Hachi-Dan (8th Degree Black Belt) 8. Iemoto / Soke An iemoto may be addressed by the title Iemoto or O-iemoto, or by the title Sōshō or Ō-sensei In English. "Grand Master" is often the title that is used. The Iemoto's main roles are to lead the school and protect its traditions, to be the final authority on matters concerning the school, to issue or approve licenses and certificates and, in some cases, to instruct the most advanced practitioners

  • BLACK BELT REGISTER | Budokan World

    BUDOKAN BLACK BELT REGISTER © 1960 - 2024 RICHARD SALMON RAY RYAN 1963* DUNLOP PAUL 1964* DERRICK WRIDGWAY 1965 FRANK VAN RENSBURG 1966* DAVID PASSMORE 1966 JOHN SINDEN 1966 STAN MAHER 1966 WHITEY POLLETT 1966* RONNIE MILLS 1966 WILLIE RIDDEX 1967* VICTOR SYKES 1967* JON WYATT 1967 MICHAEL GETAZ 1967 HERMAN VAN NIEKERK 1968 AUTREY WILKE 1968 LEO LIPINSKI 1968* THEO WOLMARANS 1968 HUGH SADLER 1968 RICKY MARCUS 1968 COLIN MATHESON 1968 BOB SIMMS 1968* STEVEN MANTHEE 1968 TREVOR WISHART 1968 DOUGGIE KNOX 1968* JONATHAN GEVISSER 1968 BILL SUTHERLAND 1968 JAN STEENKAMP 1968 DUP DUPLESSIS 1968 STAN HART 1969 HENRY WOLMARANS 1969 FRANK VAN NIEKERK 1969 BILL COLEMAN 1969 PAUL DE BEER 1969 CLIFF LOWRY-ROSS 1969* LOEK LATAGAN 1970 DON PEDDIE 1970 KELVIN FORDER 1970 MIKE HERSHOWITZ 1970 CORRIE SCHOEMAN 1970 FRIK WILLEMSE 1970 DAVE WILLIAMS 1970 FRITZ SCHREIBER 1970 KURT VAN DUYN 1970 GRAHAM MAXWELL 1970 PADDY CARSTENS 1970 NICK STAMATIS 1970 KEN LEE 1970 CLIFF LAWRIE-ROSS 1970* CAS PRETORIOUS 1971* LUZETTE HERBST 1971 TERRY BOSCH 1971 DAVE MILLAR 1972 LARRY GORGE 1972 TREVOR STEADMAN 1972 DAVID WILLS 1973 ROBER MAUVISE 1973 BRAD SHEPPHARD 1974 CRAIG JONES 1974 JOHAN COETZEE 1974 AMADEO NUNES 1974 GREG FORDER 1974 VIVIAN PLATT 1974 JAMIE NOOHAN 1975 BRIAN VAN DER MERWE 1975 BERYL BATTY 1976 TOY MARROT 1976 MARIO STEFANO 1976 MICHAEL BOND 1976* BRETT VAN ZYL 1976 JEAN CLAUDE LATTER 1976 SANDI GROOM 1976* JESSIE MOODLEY 1976 CHRIS ELLIS 1976 JEROME GUMEDE 1976 WILSON GCABA 1976 PAUL GLADMAN 1976 ANDRE LABOUCHARDIERE 1976 BRETT VAN ZYL 1976 MARION TINKLER 1976 ROCKY PRETORIOUS 1976 NEIL CRAFFORD 1976* HENNIE VAN DER MERWE 1976 * MICK MARTELL 1976 PAUL BUDDEN 1977 PETER BUSH 1977 HAMEED KAZEROONI 1977 ALAN HAIG 1977 ROY ESTABROOK 1977 ALAN DAVIES 1977 TONY HOPPER 1978 MARGARET ROGERS 1978 ROBERT ROHREY 1978 PETER MORLEY 1979 ROY MUSHENS 1979 MICHAEL SCHOFIELD 1977 ALLAN PERT 1979 ROBBIE ROWE 1979 MAHMOOD FAHKRO 1979 DEREK FLYNN 1979 GRANT PRETORIOUS 1979 HERBIE EDWARDS 1979* MALCOLM SEGAR 1979 JOHN STEENHUIZEN 1979 RAY STRODL 1979 CAROL STRODL 1979 JEAN RESCH 1980* PAUL SMITH 1980 DAVID WATERS 1980 KEITH WRIGHT 1980 PHIL NOKES 1980 JOHN HEGARTY 1980 SHANE COLEMAN 1981 JULIE TULLIS 1981* TONY GREEN 1982 SUSIE WALTERS 1982 KOBUS GROBLER 1982 IAN CARD 1982 * SUHAIL ISLAM 1982 JOHN HITCHENS 1982 GAIL COETZEE 1982 ARUN SUBBIAH 1982 DAVID STEWART 1983 CAROLYN FRANCIS 1983 KEN BROOKS 1983 ANDY COTTON 1983 DANIEL VAN VUUREN 1983 DAVID NEWMAN 1984 COBUS CALITZ 1984 MARK DALE 1984 BRIAN MAY 1984 COLIN THOMAS 1984 GORDON PARRISH 1984 STEPHEN HINDLE 1984 ANDY FOX 1985 CAROL LEVY 1985 * ROGER TYM 1985 PETER ROBINSON 1985 BOB ALLAN 1984* GARY SEGHERS 1985 DAVID ROGERS 1985 NICKI CHARNICK 1985 DALE PARRISH 1985 NEIL STARKS 1985 DIANE VAN VUUREN 1985 ROBIN FULLER 1986 ANDREW BROWN 1986 * MARK HINDLE 1986 ATTIE STONE 1986 JON FINCH 1988 LAWRENCE BROWN 1988 KEITH COETZEE 1989 SHAWN DANCER 1989 DAVE EDWARDS 1989 ANDREW HILL 1989 MICKY KLEB 1989 BURT MILLIGAN 1989 MICHAEL SPELLMAN 1990 ANNE RILEY 1991 BERYL BATTY 1991 KEITH BOSCH 1991 STEPHEN HARWOOD 1991 KELVIN DANIELS 1992 PAT MILLER 1992 TONY MCLAUGHLIN 1992 JAMES MATTHEWS 1992 PHILIP RYAN 1993 TREVOR HUGHES 1993 * HILARY CRUNDWELL 1993 PAUL MADIGAN 1993 DAVID MOTE 1994 KEITH TRIGWELL 1994 RICK WILSON 1994 ELIZABETH WRIGHT 1994 GARY DEACONS 1994 TOM FEENEY 1995 MARTIN ROSE 1995 PAUL LAZARUS 1995 ALAN LOCKHART 1996 PAUL HERMAN 1997 DAVID GOLDING 1998 WAYNE MORRIS 1998 KATHY KIRBY 1999 DARREN WAGHORNE 1999 IAN BATES 2001 JOHN LAWN 2003 ROBIN SALMON 2004 JOE BRACONE 2006 MARTIN MILNE SMITH 2006 LINDA BURNS 2007 TED WATTLESWORTH 2007 RICHARD COZENS 2008 MICHAEL CLAPHAM 2008 ROGER MILNE SMITH 2008 CLAIRE MILNE SMITH 2008 NICK SINGLETON 2009 ANDY ROBERTS 2009 DWINDAR NAR 2011 JAN CLAPHAM 2012 KEITH MOLYNEUX 2012 STEVE HEAD 2013 EAMON TOGHER 2013 TOBY MELLOWS 2013 ARTUR SIEPKA 2013 LAURENTIU SUTA 2013 ALEX BLUNT 2015 PAUL FLOYD 2015 RICHARD LILLINGTON 2015 TRACY HARPER 2016 PETER BENSON 2016 PAUL MINTO 2016 MARIE PETRELIS 2016 MARK JOSCELYNE 2017 BRIAN GOODALL 2017 IVOR HOBBINS 2018 ALISTAIR CARR 2018 CHRISTOPHER HYLTON 2019 WILL BUTCHER 2020 ARTUR BORCUCH 2021 JAMES BRYDEN 2022 © BUDOKAN BLACK BELT REGISTER 2023

  • WORKSHOPS 2022 | Budokan World

    WORKSHOPS DECEMBER WORKSHOP GO TO BUDOKAN LYMINGTON DOJO PAGE Budokan Karate ​ We missed our workshop in 2019 but at last we were able to host it at the Lymington Dojo on Saturday 4 December. ​ Thank you to those Budokan stalwarts who made it from Norwich, Shropshire, Sussex and London to come and join the locals for a workshop that focussed entirely on the fundamentals of our Karate. ​ Budokan has a proud history, legacy and lineage going back 60 years. It has an impressive Black Belt Register, of over 200 people of which the majority come from the UK. Budokan has spawned over 70 Dojo in various countries and consequently a large number of Sensei too over the years. There are two additional elements both close to my heart that Budokan is also well known and respected for. The first is our mantra - “Strong in Had - Kind in Heart” - “Kokoro ni - Tsuyoi te”. The Japanese kanji for this will appear on all future Mon. The other is just as important and that is our reputation for high standards of technical competence. As the first SHO (as in Shodan or First Dan) or Founding Sensei and Chief Instructor, here in the UK, I take it upon myself to be the Guardian of technical competence at all levels across all Budokan Dojo. ​ All Budokan Teachers and Instructors should be teaching the same fundamental and basic techniques in the "Budokan Way'. ​ And all Budokan Black Belts know this way to be the "rigorous mental and physical training towards self-realisation in the tradition of Zen Buddhism". Alex and Tony working on their Ananko basics. Will B doing MaKeri during Ananko THE FUNDAMENTALS OF BASICS IN KATA BREATHING - Kokyu - The Power of Co-ordinated Breathing STANCES - DaChi - Right Length - Right Width - Right Angle POSTURE - Shisei - Upright - Head Balanced - Eyes and Shoulders level MOVEMENT - Balance - Rotation - Stillness POWER - Stopping, Starting and Release GLIDE WALKING - TsugiAshi - Smoothness from Point to Point JANUARY WORKSHOP GO TO LYMINGTON DOJO PAGE 1/1 Budokan Aikido We practise the aikido that emerged from the Aikikai in japan in the mid to late sixties. Chiba Sensei was chosen to bring it to theUK against his wishes. His brief was basically to beef up the aikido community here. And that is exactly what he did do. The style of Aikido at the Aikikai today has little resemblance to Chiba’s aikido at all. And with the emergence of all of the other styles of Aikido such as Yoshinkan, Tomiki, Ki Aikido to name a few - Chiba chose to refer to his Aikido as that closest to the original Aikido of the Founder and called it Traditional Aikido. And that is closest to the Aikido that we practice today and we retain the same name. Because here at Budokan we practice all of our disciplines in the same spirit of Budo that Chiba endorsed and that has become part of an already existing hallmark of Budokan. ​ When Chiba went to live in the US, Budokan came under the influence and flair of the technically minimalist and highly effective Aikido of Tamura Sensei. Both contributed to what we refer to today as the “Budokan Way”. ​ KokyuNage and the Art of Ukemi Kokyunage are generally described as breathing projections and so they are to be practised with breathing in both mind and body. That is coordinated and synchronised in both mind and body. So the practice of Kokyu Nage begins to be taught using the Kgeki Ho - what are generally referred to as the entire range of “attacks” used in aikido. Many students struggle with the idea that Ukemi in Kokyu Nage is no longer the response to the feeling of pain but the conscious choice to synchronise pure action in role play, Only pure action takes place One executes the action - the other takes ukemi. As pure action that requires blending into the flow of the technique and becoming a part of it. In other words there is no "attack" and no "defence". Which is completely alien to early stage aikidoka. Whilst taking ukemi is an essential and important part of the ability to become skilful in the practice of Kokyu Nage, there are however a few things that are more important to get right first. Breathing It is a basically simple premise - Breath in when receiving and breath out when projecting. ​ Perception and Timi ng Students don’t naturally perceive potential danger in the dojo. But if you create the perception of dnager approaching and act accordingly you will move more smoothly and more importantly, at the right time . ​ Maai Part of this perception is to establish the right distance at all times in an ever changing scenario. to limit the danger but more importantly to occupy the exact space at the right time. ​ Sabaki And this is done using Sabaki - your angle of movement - particularly Irimi. And Ushiro Tenkan - especially when you need space - quickly. ​

  • NEW COPY /TEST PAGE | Budokan World

    NEW COPY AND TEST PAGE wwww © Take this over to bw.com draw a veil over the future. let go of the past. embrace the present. draw a veil over the future. let go of the past. embrace the present. This is what you should be doing while you are meditating NAME CHANGE FOR THE LEADER OF BUDOKAN The recent additions to the Accreditation and Certification Panel of Rob Rohrey (Netherlands) and Roy Estabrook (UK) voted in by the Shihankai on 5 September 2023, have meant the long-time Leader of Budokan - Sensei David Passmore will require a a name change for use on all future Rank and Title Certification and for General use on all future communications for the foreseeable future. ​ His new Title will be Saisho no Sensei 最初の先生 which means First Teacher as he was indeed the very first Budokan teacher in the UK from 1970. The name he want s used is Saisho - a shortened version of the above and is more informal than Saisho no Sensei . ​ This name change shall take place immediately. SHIHANKAI NOTICE This meeting was called to deal with matters arising from the voting in of two new members - Shihan Rob Rohrey Godan and Shihan Roy Estabrook Godan. - onto the Accreditation and Certification Pane at a meeting of the Shihanail on 3 September 2023. These appointments opened up a need to move on to a new chapter in the history of Budokan. ​ There were basically two issues:The Accreditation and Certification Process and as a result, a working Title change for Sensei David Passmore. ​ It was also decided to bring in an additional high grade representative from the Technical Panel in order to balance the technical expertise on the Accreditation Pane.l Kyoshi Darren Waghorne Rokedan fits this description perfectly. ​ So that will bring the number of Members of this Panel to 5. All these members will be entitled to have their Henko - representing their Signature - appear in full on all future Certification. ​ ​ David Passmore's title of Kyoshi awarded by the DNBK in Kyoto shall remain a title awarded by them. But it shall be replaced by a new title for general use from now on. ​ His new Title will be Saisho no Sensei 最初の先生 which means First Teacher as he was indeed the very first Budokan teacher in the UK from 1970. The name he wants used is Saisho - a shortened version of the above and is more informal than Saisho no Sensei . ​ ​ Saisho no Sensei 最初の先生 First Teacher ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ The name I want used is Saisho which means First - a shortened version of the above and is more informal than Saisho no sensei . I intended to use this shortened form Saisho with the Japanese translation 最初の先生 appearing below it on all communications. ​ COPY OF MINUTES OF 25/04/2024 Preamble There were basically two issues: The Accreditation and Certification Process and as a result, a working Title change for Sensei David Passmore. The Shihankai had voted in two new members - Shihan Rob Rohrey Godan and Shihan Roy Estabrook Godan. - onto the Accreditation and Certification Panel on 3 September 2023. These appointments opened up a need to move on to a new chapter in the history of Budokan. We also decided to bring in an additional high grade representative from the Technical Panel in order to balance the technical expertise on the Accreditation Panel. Kyoshi Darren Waghorne Rokedan fits this description perfectly. It was suggested that Henko be created for new representation on the Rank and Title Certificates so that any further certification in 2024 will roll on into 2025 and beyond. David Passmore's title of Kyoshi awarded by the DNBK in Kyoto shall remain a title awarded by them, but it shall be replaced by a new title for general use from now on. His preference was Saisho which means first teacher as he was the first Budokan teacher in the UK from 1970. (Saisho no sensei) 最初の先生 I shortened it to Saisho and Shosei has been used with my incorrect pronunciation and spelling. The name I want used is Saisho which means First - a shortened version of the above and is more informal than Saisho no sensei . I intended to use this shortened form Saisho with the Japanese translation 最初の先生 appearing below it on all communications. Eventually "Saisho" should turn into a sort of friendly "nickname". Sensei did not want the new title to b the issue of the day. He simply wants to be known for his contribution to Budokan in the UK and in South Africa during his time there. All these changes will need to be scheduled to take place after presentation to the Shihankai to be held remotely on the Sunday 25 February. The 8 Members of the Shihnkai and the Technical Panel basically form the "nursery" of new certification members and it will also be their responsibility to ensure that content is researched, approved and written for inclusion via the conduit that has been created with the appointment of Keith Molyneux to act as the formal collaborator on the Wix Platform for budokanworld.com. Members of the Shihankai are to be invited to contribute written articles or Traditional Budo Research material on a regular basis and in the absence of any material such as this, apart from existing Bio's and CV's, we will be looking for Opinion pieces from them, the subject matter of which will follow shortly. Date of Next Meeting to be confirmed The meeting closed at 12 minutes past 5 pm. A NOTE ON GRADING CHARGES For many years Budokan adopted a policy of not charging students for Kyu and Dan grade certification. We justified on the grounds of malpractice by officials of organisations for the purpose of raising funds, in the larger martial arts groups. When budokanworld.com was launched in 2010 we decided to ask the Dojo Leaders in the UK/EU/US and other countries what a fair fee would be to pay for Dan Grades* only issued by Budokan. ​ After a few months of deliberation the Dojo Leaders generally felt that Budokan had real value in the technical excellence of their Dan Grades and suggested a number of options from which Budokan settled on the Fee Structure below, which, needless to say was below that on the table. Look upon "meditation" as reflection or even contemplation. It is simply a moment in time you can find for yourself in your busy world. This program is designed to get you started on techniques you can teach yourself. In Section 1 you will learn hoe to sit to sit upright, comfortably and still for short periods of time. How to use simple breathing to help you raise your levels of attention and the ability to concentrate. My podcast Simple Meditation is a less than 15 minute must listen in order to get the "feel" of what to do. After a short period of practice you will want begin to learn to have a dee per understanding of your body, your mind and your world. For decades I used these simple exercises to help me to get to know my private clients a little better very successfully. In Section 2 you can take a look at your lifestyle. How to identify and then mange your feelings and thoughts with the Emotion Grid. See what character traits you have using the Virtue Register Scale. Your Positive and Negative Life Influencers Past and Present Your Inner Monologue Your very own Mind Map Using the mind training techniques of meditation to help you understand and address them. ​ Your upper body needs to be perfectly upright and balanced so that when you complete your meditation you should feel no muscular stiffness in your back. Your abdominal muscles and those of the lower back should be completely relaxed and not be responsible for your upright posture of your upper body. It is entirely a balanced alignment of the spine. ​ It doesn't matter whether you are sitting on a cushion on a floor, on the edge of a seat, or kneeling on a stool. Your knee needs to be below the line of your pelvis - to an angle of 5º/10º which as you can see rotates your pelvis forward slightly. This makes the lower lumbar vertebrae a little more concave and the muscles of your lower back a little softer. Which allows you to raise your rib cage in a gentle upswing, making the lower lumbar even more concave. Without moving your shoulders, extend the head slightly forward and then backward until a gentle stop is reached with a natural lowering of the chin. Your thighs should not be at 90º to the upright body. ​ In this position your muscles of the Torso become totally relaxed. You can "feel" it happening. From the neck to the shoulders - the upper chest - the shoulder blades - the upper arms - the mid-back - the abdominal muscles and the lower back. All of your muscles become relaxed and soft and do not feature in supporting your upright spine, as long as you maintain this posture. Your entire musculature of the upper body appears to feel as if they are all "hanging" from the skeletal frame. PLEASE LISTEN TO THE FULL PODCAST BEFORE YOU BEGIN TO PRACTICE. ​ ​​​​​​​​​​​​​

  • BUDOKAN NZ | Budokan World

    BUDOKAN IN NORTH ISLAND NZ BUDOKAI KARATE AND SELF DEFENCE TE KUITI WAITOMO WAIKATO NEW ZEALAND DOJO LEADER COBUS CALITZ 6 DAN KARATE guntechnz@gmail.com Self Defence classes for Women and Girls (13+) Every Wednesday 5.30-6.30 pm 1960 - 2022 "To train every day as I do, I feel blessed. Through all the years of training we mould our bodies and minds so that we enable ourselves for the unknown and to push through in tough times". Cobusstarted his karate career training with Sensei Loek Lategan in Bloemfontein, SA in 1979. They attended many Gashku together and are still in regular contact. He also had the privilege of being trained by Sensei Whitey Pollett. In addition to his own training, he currently trains women in self-defence to give them the confidence to counteract an immediate threat of violence. He believes it is not only about mastering the techniques but to train in such a way that the subconscious mind kicks in reflexively when being attacked. BREAKING NEWS Cobus is graded to 6th Dan on 11 December 2020 . "Sensei Loek told me the good news. I would like to thank you and the other dojo leaders for the recognition. It is a great honour and I truly appreciate it as it makes all the hours invested all the more worth while. Kind regards, Cobus. OUR LINEAGE BLACK BELT REGISTER

  • THE FORGOTTEN LINEAGE | Budokan World

    A LINEAGE ALL BUT FORGOTTEN SHINSEI DOJO Special Thanks to: Richard Stonell . The Yushinkan (Nakayama Hakudo) NAKAYAMA HAKUDO Hakudo demonstrates proper kiriotoshi Hakudo demonstrating proper striking Takano Sasaburo (left) and Nakayama Hakudo (right) during andemonstration of the Dai Nippon Teikoku Kendo Kata at Noma Dojo Hakudo in bogu while in seiza Hakudo was now renowned around Japan for his skill, however this was not enough for him. He traveled across Japan to study various arts like: Itto Shoden Muto Ryu, Ono ha Itto Ryu, Hokushin Itto Ryu, (Toda) Buko Ryu, Nen Ryu, Shinkage Ryu, Musashi Enmei Ryu, Jigen Ryu, Ichiden Ryu, and Ooki-Isshin Ryu. In his search he found two ryu or schools that would effectively change his life forever, Shinto Muso Ryu () and Muso Shinden Eishin Ryu In 1912 Hakudo began training in Shinto Muso Ryu Jojutsu and calligraphy under Uchida Ryogoro at Shiba Park, Tokyo and with Takeda Kohachi at his residence in Kyobashi, Tokyo. He trained very hard, finding his study of the jo to be among the most valuable of his pursuits. Hakudo wrote: “As a youth I was taught Shinto Muso Ryu by Shihan, Uchida Ryogoro. It was because of this training that I came to understand the Ura or inner methodologies of Kendo. I learned the ins and outs of handling the jo, manipulation of the feet, body mechanics, and other (fundamentals). Even in my Kendo practice I was able (utilize and) cultivate these (Jo) techniques. Thanks to this (integrated) practice I learned a lot. (In the world of martial arts) there are no kata as thoroughly developed as Shinto Muso Ryu Jojutsu’s. I believe Shinto Muso Ryu jojutsu is a national treasure.” In 1916 Hakudo was introduced to Tosa Eishin Ryu by Itagaki Taisuke (a famous Meiji statesmen and a student of Oe Masamichi). Hakudo had learned Iai before in Shindo Munen Ryu, but felt something was missing. He initially approached Oe Masamichi about training, but was rejected. Taisuke saw Hakudo’s resolve to learn the style, however and introduced Hakudo to Hosokawa Yoshimasa of the Muso Shinden Eishin Ryu school (aka. Shinmomura Ha Hasegawa Eishin Ryu) and Morimoto Tokumi of the Goto Ha Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu school (aka. Tanimura Ha Hasegawa Eishin Ryu). Hakudo was accepted as a student of both teachers, making him the first outsider to learn Tosa Eishin Ryu in history. Hakudo trained earnestly and in 1920 the Nippon Butokukai awarded Hakudo the title of Hanshi in both Kendo and Iaido. Around this time Hakudo was said to have received Menkyo Kaiden in jojutsu from Uchida Ryogoro prior to his death in 1921 (though this is greatly debated). After receiving his certification Hakudo did something unexpected: he took what he learned and created his own version of Shinto Muso Ryu, commonly referred to as Nakayama-no-Jo, along with a set of five kihon (basic drills). Shimizu Takaji was said to have later incorporated Hakudo’s five kihon into his set of twelve some years later. In 1922 Hakudo was awarded Menkyo Kaiden in Goto Ha Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu from Tokumi and Menkyo in Muso Shinden Eishin Ryu from Yoshimasa. Contrary to popular belief, however Hakudo did not recieve Menkyo Kaiden from Yoshimasa. Hakudo continued to visit both Yoshimasa and Tokumi in Kochi. During his time there Hakudo trained with Yoshimasa at his house. He maintained a very good relationship with Yoshimasa until his death in 1923. In 1925 Hakudo was asked by the head fencing instructor of the Rikugun Toyama Academy (a military academy) to assist him in creating a system of Gunto Soho ( ) or methods of manipulating military swords. Hakudo, through his research developed five standing iai kata that made the foundation of the Toyama Ryu Guntojutsu system. In the same year Hakudo supported Noma Seiji in the construction and development of the famed Noma dojo. Noma Dojo became a vessel for men and women of various ryu-ha or schools to test their skills and exchange their ideas with other kenshi. In 1927 at the age of fifty-five he received the rank of Hanshi in Jodo from the Nippon Butokukai. In 1930 Hakudo was called on by the Butokukai to demonstrate Muso Shinden Eishin Ryu publicly (outside of Kochi) for the first time in history. Hakudo had a problem though: he never recieved Menkyo Kaiden in the system. As such, during the demonstration he presented the art as ”Muso Shinden Ryu Battojutsu” (). This was done to avoid any altercations that might come from him using the school’s name. In 1933 Hakudo restructured what he learned in Kochi into Muso Shinden Ryu () using the Chinese characters for dream or vision. The Yushinkan once a training hall exclusively for Shindo Munen Ryu and Gekiken under Negishi Shingoro; became a dojo for several martial arts. Students of the Yushinkan (under Hakudo) were selected to learn specific styles. Men like Nakayama Zendo and Hashimoto Toyo learned everything while others like Nakakura Kiyoshi, Danzaki Tomoaki and Nakajima Gozoro learned only Muso Shinden Ryu Iaido and Kendo. In his time Hakudo had seen the death of stylized Gekiken and the birth of modern Kendo. In 1934 he and his contemporary Takano Sasaburo demonstrated the Dai Nippon Teikoku Kendo Kata at the Tenranjiai while Emperor Hirohito watched on. Both Hakudo and Takano were highly commended for their performances. Kendo gained popularity and Hakudo along with Takano Sasaburo became among (if not) the most requested teachers in Japan. They traveled the country teaching at universities, police stations, military bases, Japanese Government installations, and even the Imperial Palace. Hakudo’s students ran into the tens of thousands. In fact over two thirds of those who held the rank of kyoshi with the Nippon Butokukai had studied with Hakudo to some effect. World War II was a desperate time for Japan. The proud Japanese Military was being pushed back by Allied Forces. Japan had now become a target to American firebombing. Japanese buildings largely made of wood and built in close proximity to other residences became mere kindle for Allied bombs. Tokyo and other cities were decimated. This accompanied by the destruction Hiroshima and Nagasaki via Atomic Weapons brought about Japan’s formal surrender on September 2nd, 1945. Hakudo was quick to use his influence, using the Japanese idiom “a samurai never talks (bad mouths) about what is finished” Hakudo asked people to meet their American occupiers with dignity. “In fencing we call ‘ohen‘ () the spirit or ability to adapt one’s self to the change. What this means is in a condition where after understanding and acknowledging the natural tide of affairs (what has happened), all past ambitions (or goals) must be given up. In doing so one can reach the state of nothingness. This requires noble heart. It (nothingness) is the ultimate goal of fencing. We must meet the Allied Army with such a spirit. Yesterday they were our enemies, but today they are not. If we fail not to think of them as enemies, then it cannot be said that we (the Japanese) truly understand Bushido. If there is even the smallest feeling of ill will remaining in our hearts and if we cannot take a broader outlook, it will to show in our faces and attitude, giving reason for them (Allied soldiers) to think of us as cowardly. I am of the personal belief that the greatness of a nation lies in its open-mindedness.” The end of the war brought on many hardships. In an effort to pacify the Japanese people Japanese martial arts were banned. This brought Hakudo in cooperation with his compatriots to fight for the right to practice martial arts in Japan. Eventually through the help of Sasamori Junzo, Kuroda Yasuji, and Kunii Zenya the ban on martial arts as a whole was eventually lifted. Japanese could practice martial arts again. Hakudo’s victory brought about harsh realities however. Many of his most dedicated students died in the war, with even fewer of the surviving returned to train. Budo fell into decline. Hakudo felt a change was needed. Hakudo restructured Muso Shinden Ryu for the general populous. The attempt was to reduce the aggressive nature of the kata and emphasize the more spiritual side of the ryu. Certain aspects of the kata were changed to reflect this. Omori Ryu’s Gyakuto for example, pre-war ended with stabbing the teki in the back of the head. Hakudo later changed the stab into Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu’s todome, which was considered a more merciful coup de grâce. Hakudo demonstrating proper Nukitsuke Nakayama Hakudo (right), Hashimoto Toyo (left), HasegawaEishin Ryu: Oroshi (*Authors note* the Pre-War Gyakuto Todome was done far differently than what most iaido-ka do it today. The sword was raised high in the air and caught on the mune of the blade with the middle finger. Then after flattening the palm against back of the blade, it was thrust into the part of the head where the spine meets the skull [US. Marine Scout Snipers were taught to shoot the same spot]. The Yushinkan preserved this method). Hakudo did have several regrets. In his Kendo Koshutsujyu or Collection of Oral dictations on Kendo, Hakudo talked about his regret over a style he kept in secrecy from most of his students. The style of Hayashizaki Jinsuke Minamoto no Shigenobu. Hakudo intended all of his serious students to learn all of his arts. Only those students who pursued and progress in all of Hakudo’s arts had access to what Hakudo called Hayashizaki Hon Ryu () or the real teachings of Hayashizaki Jinsuke Shigenobu. According to Hakudo only nine people learned the first inner tier of the school; they were: Otuska Iwao (Menkyo) Hasegawa Minoshiro (Menkyo) Ohayashi Jungo (Menkyo) Sakonji Tadaichi (Menkyo) Nakayama Zendo (Menkyo) Aoki Eizou (Menkyo) Hashimoto Toyo (Menkyo) Mukuta Kozou (Menkyo) Suhara Sugematsu (Menkyo) Hakudo added that only four individuals surpassed them by learning all the kata and in effect achieving Menkyo Kaiden, their names were: Nakayama Zendo (Menkyo Kaiden) Hashimoto Toyo (Menkyo Kaiden) Mukuta Kozou (Menkyo Kaiden) Sakonji Tadaichi (Menkyo Kaiden) Hakudo said, it was his intention to teach the Hayashizaki Hon Ryu () school more, but by the end of the war he lacked the proper time and suitable candidates to do so. This is not to say that Hakudo did not foster or teach his other students. Less than a handful of outstanding students ever received any traditional ranking (ie. Densho) from Hakudo. The most notable of them were perhaps Matsuo Kenpu and Kimura Eijyu, who received Menkyo Kaiden in Muso Shinden Ryu Iaido (). The man called “The Last (True) Martial Artist” () died in 1958 at the age of eighty-five. Hakudo was survived by his son Nakayama Zendo to whom he passed all of his knowledge onto. Hakudo demonstrates the kata Junto CLICK HERE TO READ THE GLOSSARY OF TEACHERS AND INFLUENCERS Introduction There are few martial artists in history who have been able to influence an entire generation of politicians, military personnel, police, educators, and civilians alike. Who’s student’s (if only for a day) talked about their experiences with him in detail nearly seventy years after his death. The first San-Dou-no-Hanshi in history. The “God of Kendo” () Nakayama Hakudo. Nakayama Hakudo was arguably the most influential martial artist in modern history. Many instructors and students around the world claim to have some “connection” to him, having practiced some form or another of his Iaido. Yet, these same people (in Japan and abroad) know little more than his name. Only by looking at his humble origins, ambitions, accomplishments, and outlooks can we come closer to understanding the man and his styles. Nakayama Hakudo Second Generation Headmaster of the Yushinkan Dojo Second Generation Headmaster of Kanto Ha Shindo Munen Ryu Kenjutsu Creator of Muso Shinden Ryu Iaido and Nakayama no Jo KendoIaidoJodoSan-Dou-no-Hanshi Nakayama Otsuyoshi () was born in in Imae, Komatsu City, Ishikawa Prefecture in 1873, the eighth son of former Maeda clansman Nakayama Gennosho. At the age of five his family moved to Nakacho in Toyama where they opened a small yakitori restaurant located in East Sogawa Merchant Lane. The restaurant was located on the first avenue off of Main Street, and was a modest shop by most accounts. At age eight the young Otsuyoshi came to work in local inn (ryokan: a Japanese traditional inn) called “Toyama Hall” located just two streets over from his family’s yakitori shop. There in Toyama Hall he worked in the kitchen. As his luck would have it the manager of the inn, one Takazawa Toyoshi (a kind and loving man by all accounts) encouraged the young Otsuyoshi to pursue swordsmanship after seeing the eight year old playing with a bokken (wooden sword) fashioned from a tree branch. At age eleven he gained entrance to Saito Michinori’s dojo of the Yamaguchi Ha Itto Ryu school of swordsmanship in Hoshiicho off Sogawa Lane. The young Otsuyoshi had a busy schedule. In the morning he would travel to Nishi-jubucho where he learned how to read and write at the Ada Kanji Academy (a supplementary school). In the afternoon after school he would go to Michinori’s dojo where he to trained in Yamaguchi Ha Itto Ryu. He then went straight from the dojo to work at the “Toyama Hall.” Otsuyoshi progressed under his various teachers until a visitor from Tokyo changed his life forever. A swordsman of sizable skill by the name of Hosoda Kenzo took up residence in the “Toyama Hall”. Kenzo, an educator by trade was just transferred to Toyama by The Ministry of Education. He was a member of the Yushinkan Dojo (), a Shindo Munen Ryu school run by Negishi Shingoro. Highly impressed the young Otsuyoshi talked to Kenzo for hours. Kenzo’s stories and insights into swordsmanship left a great impression on the Otsuyoshi, ultimately shaping his entire life. In 1890 Kenzo handed in his letter of resignation to the Toyama school district and returned to Toyko. His departure left the young Otsuyoshi with many questions. Otsuyoshi felt it was time. He received permission from his family and employer to travel to Tokyo to pursue kenjutsu. Takazawa was kind enough to escort the young Otsuyoshi to Iwasehama, a small port in Toyama Prefecture. There Otsuyoshi boarded a ship to Naoetsu, Niigata Prefecture. At Naoetsu he boarded a steam ship that sailed to Ueno, Tokyo. It was there on the open Japanese Sea that Otsuyoshi, with the cold sea air on his face remembered the words of Takazawa: “Otsuyoshi, you’ll be a man who other men fall in love with“. These words stuck with Otsuyoshi well into his adulthood. Otsuyoshi arrived in Tokyo in 1891. There, armed with a letter of introduction from Kenzo, Otsuyoshi was successfully admitted into Shingoro’s Yushinkan at the age of eighteen. Otsuyoshi trained hard, changing his name to Hakudo () at age nineteen. Shingoro encouraged him to study other styles and literature. He tried his hand at various ryu, or schools, sleeping only four hours a day so that he could attend around five-six practices a day. Hakudo was not perfect, however and had several bad habits to overcome. In shiai geiko Hakudo’s hip rose every time before a strike, telegraphing his intentions to his opponent. In order to correct this Hakudo was forced to wear stones around his waist to improve his center of gravity. To learn to execute suri-ashi in a more effective way, Hakudo was made to wear geta (Japanese wooden sandals) with a loose thread. This allowed him to develop a type of scraping suri-ashi, making his movement harder to see. Hakudo’s intense dedication paid off and he rapidly advanced through the ranks. In 1906 he fought the bouts that came to define his early career as a swordsmen. At the Dai Nippon Butokusai Enbu Taikai he defeated Ozawa Jiro and Takano Shigeyoshi of the Hokushin Itto Ryu school, Koseki Kiyomasa of the Muhen Ryu school, and Sasaki Masanobu of the Suifu Ryu. At twenty three he received Jun-Menkyo and at twenty-seven was licensed Menkyo, Inkyo. At twenty-eight he was named Daihan or “Acting Headmaster” and was married to Shigoro’s daughter. Thus, Hakudo was adopted into the Negishi family (becoming Negishi Hakudo). In 1912 Shingoro elected Hakudo to take his place on the committee responsible for creating the Dai Nippon Teikoku Kendo Kata. There were several problems, however and both Hakudo and his wife separated from the Negishi Family for personal reasons, rejoining the Hakudo Family. Hakudo then built his own dojo in Masagocho, Hongo ward (present day Bunkyo ward) and was given permission to use the Yushinkan name.

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